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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

America's Throw Away Indian: Embracing Apples


#ATAIP: ENTRY NUMBER FIVE
EMBRACING APPLES

Since I am unable to sleep, I will pose a question for my audience to answer.

Who in my audience can tell me what it means to be an "Apple"?

Who in my audience can tell me what it feels like to be called an "Apple"?  Can anyone tell me they understand what it feels like to be in a group of  "Rez" N8VZ, you know to them, you are an apple?

Who in my audience has been called an apple?  A sell out?

Who in my audience has called one of their brother's or sister's an "Apple"?

I can tell you this, when I am being judged an "Apple",  it feels it like a thousand bees are stinging me.

Please post your answers in the comment section at the bottom of this post.





















4 comments:

  1. Growing up on the Diné Reservation, I have been ridiculed about not being fluent in Navajo by my own people. I have a Diné boyfriend, while he does care for me, who constantly brings up my exes who are "white" men. Everytime he feels like he's been slighted by "white" prejudice, he gets angry & asks, rhetorically of course, how can I live & work in their world?! Sometimes I feel he almost hates me as much as he hates them. The only thing I don't understand is how someone or some of my people can hate on me because I didn't grow up the same as them.. It makes me sad that my Mother didn't teach us more traditions & our own language as we grew up. She was taken from her family by the government when she was young & sent to boarding schools off-reservation. While she was fluent in Navajo & went to work for the BIA, she always said that English is what will get us far in this new world. Now that I'm older, I wish I was fluent in my Native tongue & cultural traditions so I could have taught my son to be more traditional, not an "apple" like his mother.

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  2. Apple = Red on the outside, white on the inside.

    In my opinion, it is the single most powerful display of the colonization of the Indigenous people of North America and Canada.

    Being bicultural, I can say I am too red for the white and too white for the red world. That's what being an Apple feels like.

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  3. been called an apple/wannabe many times, born to white/finnish mom lived grew up with her,bio-father not enrolled tribal member, illegal adoption in 1935ish,bloodline comes from him.i don't like that term much like "n-word" n many other derogatory racist terms.i felt never enough white/red n will not use it.ur amazing BMB.

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  4. I am honored and humbled. Your comments brought me to tears. To me comments are priceless.

    Forever grateful,

    BigMamaBlaze~BMB

    ReplyDelete

Please refrain from derogatory comments. Try to maintain comments as to inspire polite dialog.